Educating the people building the roads: Planners

With the policy change, we will be seeing a citywide culture shift across board from elected leaders, city staff, and ordinary citizens; everyone. One of the goals of the complete streets movement is about winning over the engineering profession, and Making them have a vision about streets for everyone.

SET A STANDARD

Much like a Bicycle Friendly Community action plan, Complete Streets Policy envisions a Nigeria’s alternative transportation future, rather than a prescriptive, one-mode-fits all strategy. Complete streets policy allow the fostering needs and character of the community to guide the work. Emphasis on the complete street policy does not only serve to further acknowledge bicycling as the safest means of transportation and the most effective form of sporting activity aside swimming, it also sets a design standard for a nation’s infrastructural facilities ensuring that they are designed right the first time. The purpose of this city’s policy is to set forth guiding principles and practices to be considered in the design operations and maintenance culture of streets infrastructures to promote safe and convenient access and travelers facilities for all users.

FIND A COMMON CAUSE

Complete Streets Policy is not that complicated yet, sometimes it can be a tough sell. Finding a common cause of concern can be an excellent way to start the conversation. Our focus is to reduce traffic fatalities.

How were we going to do it?

This just means proper and integrated infra-structural adherence and legal compliance.

WIN OVER TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERS

One of the goals of the Complete Streets movement is about winning over the engineering professional and showing them a vision of streets for everyone. Appealing to the problem solving side of engineers are hoped to yield great results. The Nigerian Society of Engineers should be supportive of the Complete Streets Policy.

In order to sell it, you need to bring in the experts that can lay out the complete street master plan, meaning there is often a misconception of what they look like. Good design guidance and training is crucial. Once it is explained how, some paint and small adjustments can be inexpensive, safe solutions to the problem are ensured.

NOT ONE-MODE-FITS-ALL

While there are lots of great expectations, it is thoughtful to note that the concept of a complete street components includes, street and sidewalk lighting, pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, that is in compliance with the International disabilities Act, public transit facilities accommodation including pedestrian access improvement to transit stops and stations, street trees and landscaping, drainage and other street amenities.

This policy and its implementation should follow a project-by project systematic approach. At the planning phase, the city will conduct a study and analysis to see how best to integrate these elements into the project. Complete road diet includes the addition of bike lanes as part of a resurfacing project, arterial road running through cities, town. Bicyclists will be ecstatic about the road and how it offers an improved option to commute to work/schools, exercise or visit remote sites.

A six-step planning process is built into road projects to incorporate an up-to-date land and transportation use, as well as the planned future use in context. This process is hoped to be successfully integrated into the Complete Streets Coalition Training Workshops. Many agencies will enjoy the expanded toolbox that Complete Streets offers them. The program is very well outlined. City officials will learn to do by experimentation and then codify what works. Such flexible approaches will alleviate transportation agencies’ fears, so that their plans will include all modes, regardless of need or of context. Policies should also include a list of exceptions, like when a mode is prohibited (think limited access highway), when costs are exceptionally disproportion to the anticipated use or when there is a documented lack of current or future need.

These policies may require a high-level agency sign off. Policy is simple and headache free. Complete Streets Policy will help our Nigeria states move away from being an auto-centric community. We should strive to encourage transportation in the full sense of the word. Cities should work on improving
their BFC status and ensure a Complete Streets Policies, Adherence and invest significantly in capital improvements by designing and constructing first class transportation facilities for all users.

Complete Streets Policy sets a framework for continued smart growth, well into the future. The sentiment of many bicycling advocates is very timely for us now. We should have been doing this years ago.

As a business, collaborate, should invest heavily in mobility choices for their employee through bus passes and stipends for biking and walking. Advocacy is just the beginning. Legislature should recognize the need to address multi-modal access to get our expansion plan passed, we need to find a way to mitigate that impact, to be a good neighbour. Bicycle Boulevards and connections to trails should be made as part of the plan of Hospitals preliminary design framework, make financial investments in multi-modal transportation in the neighbourhood, transportation improvements surrounding the campus. Effort should be geared towards installing walk-able, bike-able, pedestrian ways. Local advocates and hospital representatives should host a ride-about for city council to show where these improvements are going and the impacts on the patients. Without these efforts toward auto traffic mitigation, critics will push the city council to reject the contentious bicycle improvements plan.

The most effective Complete Streets policies should be applied across the
transportation network, ensuring strong connectivity for all modes throughout.